Shared from the 1/29/2017 The Modesto Bee eEdition

Students get inside look at tools, techniques used for careers in medicine

Picture
ANDY ALFARO aalfaro@modbee.com

Gregori freshman Blake Antoe, left, and other students participate in a hands-on demonstration of laparoscopic surgery tools with Dr. Amar Deol, right, during Destination Medicine at the Stanislaus County Institute of Learning in Ceres on Saturday.

Picture
ANDY ALFARO aalfaro@modbee.com

Gregori junior Christina Gonzales tries using laparoscopy tools. Students rotated through five workshops.

Picture
ANDY ALFARO aalfaro@modbee.com

Gregori juniors Maisa Rahman, middle, and Jennifer Carrillo, left, perform hands-only CPR during the Destination Medicine event in Ceres on Saturday. The event was intended to encourage homegrown talent to enter the field of medicine.

Perform laparoscopic surgery on a pumpkin. Hold a racquetball-sized kidney stone. Watch as triplets move around inside their mother’s womb.

Stanislaus County students who attended Destination Medicine got a firsthand, and in many cases hands-on, look at various health care professions. The first one-day, countywide medical career day attracted some 125 students from across 17 public high schools at the Stanislaus County Institute of Learning in Ceres on Saturday. The free event was a partnership between the Stanislaus County Office of Education and the Stanislaus Medical Society.

“Wasn’t that fun?” exclaimed Oakdale High senior Jesscina Crawford, as she came out of a session on laparoscopy – a minimally invasive form of surgery that uses a thin telescopic rod fitted with a camera to perform examinations and procedures. Students rotated through five workshops, demonstrating everything from laparoscopy to radiology, pathology to first-aid and emergency medical procedures.

Organizers wanted to ensure the day was more than just seminars and sitting at desks and strove to make each session more hands-on. So, students performed real laparoscopic surgery on a pumpkin and were able to watch a series of real-time ultrasounds of pregnant women who had volunteered to assist. Other students could examine a shelf full of medical specimens including intestines, amputated fingers, gallstones and the like.

All of the day’s participants, from the doctors to the medical technicians, volunteered their time. Health care groups from across the region signed on to sponsor the event and some 30 medical professionals took part. Dr. Rosalio Rubio and Dr. Roger Lewis helped organize the event on behalf of the 900-member Stanislaus Medical Society.

"WE WANTED IT TO BE AS INTERACTIVE AS POSSIBLE, WE DIDN’T WANT IT TO JUST BE LECTURES. AND WE WANTED IT TO INCLUDE AS MANY FIELDS OF MEDICINE AS POSSIBLE.
Dr. Rosalio Rubio

“We wanted it to be as interactive as possible; we didn’t want it to just be lectures. And we wanted it to include as many fields of medicine as possible,” Rubio said.

Their hope for the event is that it will encourage more homegrown talent to enter the field of medicine and then return to the region to practice. Lewis said shortages of doctors and other health care professionals have been a regular problem over the years.

“We want kids who grow up here, loved where they lived and go to school to come back to help with the communities and populations here,” he said. “We want to give them a magic experience to the point they become interested in medicine and maybe think about coming home and practicing.”

For many of the students, the day proved to be a reaffirming event. Some already had planned on or thought about entering the medical field. Enochs High sophomore Kelsey Andasola wants to become a surgeon and said the day was a great experience for her.

“You are learning a lot and it is really educational,” she said. “It affirmed the fact that I want to go into medicine. Now I’m more for sure,” she said.

Students also got the chance to talk with physicians and medical professionals one-on-one and see how they work together to help patients.

“You get to see that medicine is a team. It was interesting seeing all the different fields, and the doctors have been really easy to talk to,” said Beyer High senior Jed-Kyle Ramirez. “If they had another one with different sessions, I’d definitely go again.”

Marijke Rowland: 209-578-2284, @marijkerowland

VIDEO

Watch a video report to find out more. modbee.com

See this article in the e-Edition Here