Shared from the 2017-10-07 Atlanta Journal Constitution eEdition

Peach Buzz

With crisis over, historical society names trustees

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The Georgia Historical Society, which houses a rare draft copy of the U.S. Constitution, has named new trustees.

JENNIFER BRETT /JBRETT@AJC.COM

Did you know there’s a rare draft copy of the U.S. Constitution in Savannah? I didn’t until getting sent eastbound and down for Hurricane Irma duty. It was Tropical Storm Irma by the time it arrived but still managed to whack Georgia’s coast pretty good, toppling trees and swamping streets.

Thanks to diligent staff members and a time-tested disaster plan, the document (which was once owned by founding University of Georgia President Abraham Baldwin) was never in danger. It’s the crown jewel of the Georgia Historical Society, headquartered in a building dating to 1875 off Forsyth Park, where a palm tree lay horizontal the day after Irma blew through. By the time people were boarding up windows and laying sandbags in what proved to be a largely futile effort, it and other priceless pieces of history were safely ensconced in the society’s vault.

“We have to prepare every time as if it was the worst case scenario,” said senior historian Stan Deaton. “We can’t get caught flat-footed.”

So, there’s an anecdote you can use to start the conversation at next year’s Trustees Gala, themed “A Royal Intent.” King George II established the original Georgia Trustees in 1732 to found an English colony that became the state named after him. Their motto was Non Sibi, Sed Aliis, meaning, “Not for Self, but for Others.”

The gala will be held Feb. 17 at the end of the 2018 Georgia History Festival, and the society announced this week that Gov. Nathan Deal will induct two new trustees at the event: Delta Air Lines president and CEO Ed Bastian and Paul Bowers, who is chairman, president, and CEO of Georgia Power.

“Ed Bastian and Paul Bowers exemplify in their lives and careers the highest standard of ‘Not for Self, but for Others’ set by the founding trustees of Georgia,” said Dr. W. Todd Groce, president and CEO of the Georgia Historical Society. “The impact of their remarkable leadership is felt daily not only here in Georgia but around the world, and we are honored that they will be inducted by Gov. Deal as the newest Georgia trustees.”

Past trustees have included former Atlanta Mayor and U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young, Atlanta Falcons/United owner Arthur Blank and his Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus, Savannah College of Art and Design and SCAD-Atlanta President Paula Wallace and Alana Smith Shepherd, co-founder of the Shepherd Center in Atlanta.

For information about the festival or gala see georgiahistoryfestival.org.

Chalk Talk

Chalktoberfest is a street festival where the street literally is the festival. The annual event in Marietta features chalk artists who render the streets around the Marietta Square into incredible, yet sadly ephemeral, works of art. So you don’t want to miss it or the accompanying craft beer festival. It’s 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 14 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 15. Proceeds benefit the Marietta/Cobb Museum of Art. Information: chalktoberfest.com.

Come and sip a spell tonight in Avondale Estates

If you’re free this evening, the Avondale Estates Business Association would love to raise a glass with you. From 4 to 7 p.m. the association’s inaugural Sip ‘n Stroll tour will feature more than 50 wines from around the world. Pick up a souvenir wine glasses and programs at N. Avon-dale Road and Oak Street, then stroll through the business district. If you get tired of walking, the FurBus will give you a lift. Tickets will be available onsite for $30—cash or check only—at Purple Corkscrew Wine Shop & Tasting Room, 32 N. Avon-dale. Or, order online at freshtix.com/events/sipstroll-aeba. Online tickets include a transaction fee, bringing the total to $37.74. Event proceeds will support the Avondale Estates Business Association’s future events.

Your daily roundup of celeb news and chatter By Jennifer Brett jbrett@ajc.com

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